Enter Trail #11, The Jefferson County Quilt Trail—-sponsored by Stone Bank

Welcome to the Jefferson County Quilt Trail. The trail was developed by volunteer Sharon Price. Jefferson County, established in 1829, is located in the Arkansas Delta. The Arkansas River bisects the county from the northwest to the southeast. Pine Bluff is the county seat, and other towns include Altheimer, Redfield, Wabbaseka, White Hall, and Sherrill. Some of the area attractions include the Arkansas Entertainers Hall of Fame, Pine Bluff/Jefferson County Historical museum-located in the 1906 Union Station train depot, Delta Rivers Nature Center, the Arts and Science Center for Southeast Arkansas, and the Arkansas Railroad Museum to name a few. The county is home to University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff.

#11-1, Welcome Home
1010 Wolfe Rd.
Redfield AR

#11-1, Welcome Home, is a 2 ft x 2 ft barn quilt mounted on the front of the barn at 1010 Wolfe Road, Redfield Arkansas.  The pattern was chosen and painted by Sharon Price as a housewarming gift for Tom Tom and Deborah Hughes when they built their current home in 2018.  The barn is actually a corncrib that was built in the mid 1930s by Tony McBurnett with pine timber from the McBurnett homestead.  The McBurnetts came from Ireland in the 1800s and homesteaded the land in 1898 after moving from an Arkansas farm four miles east of the current barn site.  Tony McBurnett was born on the property in 1903. He grew up and raised his family here. Tom Tom Hughes is the grandson of Tony McBurnett. Redfield, with a population of about 1300, is in northwestern Jefferson County and situated on the Union Pacific Railway. Four properties in Redfield have been added to the National Register of Historic Places: Dollarway Road (1974), West James Street Overpass (1995), Lone Star Baptist Church (2005), and Redfield School Historic District (2014). The latter is the location of Redfield Community Center which encompasses a depression-era school complex at 101 School Street. The M. A. Hardin Elementary School, part of the White Hall School District, is located in Redfield.

#11-2, We Love America
1010 Wolfe Rd.
Redfield AR


#11-2, We Love America is an 18” x 18” barn quilt mounted on the front of the barn/corncrib at 1010 Wolfe Road, Redfield AR.  The pattern was chosen and painted by Sharon Price for Tom Tom and Deborah Hughes to represent their friendship and mutual love for the USA. The corn crib was built in the mid 1930s and was used for storing corn to feed the hogs on the McBurnett homestead. It was built out of switch ties, creosol cured poles, and pine boards.  It has a solid floor that sits on concrete blocks.  Some of the blocks came from the old Dollarway Road that was built through Redfield in 1914. The 1 x 4 inch pine boards are placed on 4 x 6 pine wall timbers allowing a 1.5 inch gap that allows air to cure the corn before being hammered in a hammer mill. The barn later stored corn for cattle feed lot operations. The barn is now used by Tom to fabricate horse scales. Tom makes the scales for a Kentucky company that sends a truck out each month to pick up the scales he has made. You’ll see two quilt blocks at this address.

#11-3, Railroad Crossing
4002 River Rd.
Redfield AR

#11-3, Railroad Crossing, is a 4 ft by 4 ft barn quilt mounted on the front gable of the shop at 4002 River Road, Redfield Arkansas and owned by Jim and Sharon Price.  The pattern was chosen and painted by Sharon, who at the time was new to both quilting and barn quilt painting.  The design is colorful, but simple and reminds one of the importance of railroads to Jefferson County. Many people in our community made a good living working for the railroad. The Little Rock, Mississippi River, and Texas Railroad built a line from Chicot Point (Chicot County) to Pine Bluff in 1873. Financial problems that year delayed completion of the line to Little Rock for several years, but James Kirkwood Brodie anticipated the completion of the line and invested in land along its route. For $71.28, Brodie bought 163 acres from the State of Arkansas, land that had been seized from the former owners for failure to pay taxes. Brodie also bought half-interest in 120 acres adjacent to his land. In August 1880, Brodie sold a 300-foot right-of-way through his land to the railroad and immediately hired John Martin, the Jefferson County surveyor, to plat a city on his land. The city was named Redfield for John E. Redfield, who was president of the railroad from 1875 to 1881. Redfield had a passenger stop from the founding of the town until about 1950.  The train depot was on the southeast side of the track, along what is currently SE Railroad Street.  The building was sold and moved about a block toward the east and is now used as the Church of Christ near the corner of Sheridan Road and Brodie.

#11-4, Three Crosses
4002 River Rd.
Redfield AR

#11-4, Three Crosses, is an 18” x 18” barn quilt hanging from the east side of the mailbox at 4002 River Road, Redfield Arkansas.  The pattern was chosen and painted by Sharon Price to signify the importance of the Cross in the life of their family. The barn quilt represents faith in our Savior, a huge part of life in this area. Arkansas is part of what is known as the Bible Belt.  The three crosses allude to the crucifixion account in the Gospel of Luke. The Roman government crucified Jesus and two unnamed thieves. The central cross is larger because our Savior was crucified there, even though no fault was found in Him. One of the thieves realized that Jesus was the Son of God and repented.  Jesus promised that He would see him in paradise the same day. (Luke 23:43) Redfield is home to many churches, providing residents places to worship, fellowship, and serve together throughout the community.

#11-5, Patriotism
4002 River Rd.
Redfield AR

#11-5, Patriotism, is an 18” x 18” barn quilt hanging from the west side of the mailbox at 4002 River Road, Redfield Arkansas.  The pattern was chosen and painted by Sharon Price to display her love of country and all things USA.  River Road is heavily travelled as locals and visitors make their way to Tar Camp Park on the Arkansas River.  The Corp of Engineer park, before the flood of 2019, was open for camping.  Patriotism is a large part of rural life in Arkansas.  Each year, the city of Redfield hosts a 4th of July parade. Local families and businesses create floats to display their pride in the community and love for country. Redfield is home to many veterans who have served our country. It is also home to American Legion Post 343. A US Army Installation, the Pine Bluff Arsenal is located northwest of Pine Bluff. Per wikipedia, PBA supplies specialized production, storage, maintenance and distribution of readiness products, and delivers technical services to the Armed Forces and Homeland Security. Pine Bluff Arsenal has a total area of 13,493 acres with 665 buildings, 271 igloos and storage capacity of 2,090,563 sq ft. Pine Bluff Arsenal has more than 5,000 acres of land with the potential to be developed.

#11-6, Harley Orange
4002 River Rd.
Redfield AR

#11-6, Harley Orange, is a 2 ft x 2 ft barn quilt mounted on the front gable of the smaller shop at 4002 River Road, Redfield AR.  Visitors will have to approach the family home via the gravel driveway to view this barn quilt.  The pattern was chosen and painted by Sharon Price for her husband, Jim Price, whose favorite color is orange.  The quilt is monogramed with the initial P for the Price surname.  The shop houses the family Harley Davidson motorcycle that is used for transportation and recreation. It was on the trips on this motorcycle that the Prices were introduced to barn quilts and grew to love them. They have ridden through 21 states and the District of Columbia on the motorcycle. Sharon and Jim participated in Rolling Thunder Run for the Wall in 2012 and 2015. The event is in Washington DC on Sunday of Memorial Day Weekend to show continued support for the efforts to find lost service men and women of past conflicts.

#11-7, Sunflower Bouquet
2412 Cook Rd.
White Hall AR

#11-7, Sunflower Bouquet, is a 4 ft x 4 ft barn quilt hanging on the barn at 2412 Cook Road, White Hall, AR.  The pattern was chosen by Billie Cook, owner of the property, and painted by Sharon Price as a gift to her mother.  Quilting has been a big part of Mrs. Cook’s life and she fell in love with the barn quilts during travels across the country.  Sunflowers are one of her favorite flowers. The Cook family has lived on this property for about 80 years and the road was named for them since they had lived on the road longer than any other residents. According to the National Sunflower Association, the Sunflower was a common crop among American Indian tribes throughout North America. Evidence suggests that the plant was cultivated by American Indians in present-day Arizona and New Mexico about 3000 BC. Some archaeologists suggest that the sunflower may have been domesticated before corn. A number of variations exist for sunflower quilt patterns. It’s a popular pattern reminiscent of fields of sunflowers in late summer.

#11-8, Windmill
2412 Cook Rd.
White Hall AR


#11-8, Windmill, is a 2 ft x 2 ft barn quilt hanging in the gable of the barn at 2412 Cook Road, White Hall, AR.  The design was chosen by Billie Cook, owner of the property, and painted by Sharon Price. The barn quilt is a reminder of the many windmills that can be seen in rural areas of Arkansas. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, American colonists used windmills to grind grain, to pump water, and to cut wood at sawmills. Homesteaders and ranchers installed thousands of wind pumps as they settled the western United States. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, small wind-electric generators (wind turbines) were also widely used. The number of wind pumps and wind turbines declined as rural electrification programs in the 1930’s extended power lines to most farms and ranches across the country. However, some ranches still use wind pumps to supply water for livestock. Small wind turbines are becoming more common again, mainly to supply electricity in remote and rural areas.

#11-9, Lazy V Mariner’s Compass
7416 Camden Cutoff
Pine Bluff AR

#11-9, Mariner’s Compass, is a 3 ft x 3 ft barn quilt hanging on the East side of the shop at 7416 Camden Cutoff, Pine Bluff Arkansas. The property is part of Lazy V Farm, owned by James and Barbara Varnell. Barn quilts are clearly visible from the southernmost gate, a red farm gate with a large enough area that visitors can pull in to view the quilts from outside the gate. This design honors the men in their family who travel.  Mr. Varnell comes from a long line of railroad engineers and is one himself.  Barbara’s brother is currently active military deployed overseas with the U.S. Navy, giving the quilt lots of meaning for the family. Each time they say farewell for a bit, they hope and pray that all roads lead to home. Chinese scientists may have developed navigational compasses as early as the 11th or 12th century. Western Europeans soon followed at the end of the 12th century. In their earliest use, compasses were likely used as backups for when the sun, stars, or other landmarks could not be seen. Mariner’s Compass is the name quilters use to refer to star designs that radiate from the center of a circle as opposed to the star designs that grow from a square. The first known quilt to use this design was made in 1726, in England.

#11-10, Mimi’s Garden
7416 Camden Cutoff
Pine Bluff AR

#11-10, Mimi’s Garden, is a 4 ft x 6 ft barn quilt hanging on the South side of the shop at 7416 Camden Cutoff, Pine Bluff Arkansas. The property is part of Lazy V Farm, owned by James and Barbara Varnell.  Drive to the red farm gate for quilt viewing. Ever since the family moved here 13 years ago, the farm has yielded surprises each season. The surprise spider lilies pop up each fall, represented by the outside border of this quilt in deep red. The spiderwort flowers here are the bluest color variation Barbara has ever seen and add contrast to flower beds and fields alike. There’s a spot along Dyson Creek in the middle of their property where spiderworts bloom blue beside red cardinal wildflowers, the moss there is a bright green and the chanterelle mushrooms are the same golden yellow in this quilt each summer. It’s untamed and a favorite spot to sit and watch the natural world. The paint colors were chosen to attempt to replicate that beauty.  The four spiderwort quilt blocks flank the dragonfly, honeybee, cardinal and hummingbird blocks and encircle the sunflower in the center. The honeybees and sunflowers were personal additions to the flora and fauna of their place. The McIntire family lived on the property from 1942 until their estate sold to the Varnell family in 2006. They try to honor Mrs. Mac’s legacy by caring for the mature plantings of pecan trees, crepe myrtles, spring bulbs, and wildflowers she left behind and then add to them each year.

#11-11, Friendship Star
7416 Camden Cutoff
Pine Bluff AR

#11-11, Friendship Star, is a 4 ft x 4 ft barn quilt hanging on the south side of the shop at 7416 Camden Cutoff, Pine Bluff AR.  The property is part of Lazy V Farm, owned by James and Barbara Varnell.  Drive to the red farm gate for quilt viewing.  This barn quilt represents one of the family’s favorite pastimes, the simple pleasure of sitting under the stars and visiting with friends around a warm fire. Their circle of friends is small but beloved. The quilt has a border of the flying geese quilt pattern because each evening there is a small flock of Canadian geese that honk and seem to say good night as they pass over the farm to land at the Varnell’s brother and sister-in-law’s pond, just through the woods. You’ll see two quilt blocks at the Varnell’s property and maybe some friends gathering by the fire while stargazing, and if you’re lucky….some Canadian geese flying over. You’ll at least think of these sights and sounds when you see the barn quilt.

#11-12, Arkansas Star
2505 Weekly Rd.
Pine Bluff AR

#11-12, Arkansas Star, is a 4 ft x 4 ft barn quilt that hangs on the front porch of the home of Travis and Ashley Thompson at 2505 Weekly Road, Pine Bluff Arkansas. The pattern is a four point Arkansas Star in dark blue, light blue, red, pink, and gray. This barn quilt was a birthday gift from Ashley’s sister and the first barn quilt of four to be hung on the property. Ashley chose to hang the barn quilt on the front porch of their home to bring back a little history of quilt-making. In the 1800’s gatherings were hosted where family and friends would sit around a large frame to sew as a whole to complete a quilt. Just imagine the wonderful times they had as they sat around the quilting frame and talked for hours. Just like in those days, the Arkansas Star barn quilt has brought much joy along with history, art, décor, and conversation to their front porch.  The design well represents their home state of Arkansas.

#11-13, Amish Star
2505 Weekly Rd.
Pine Bluff AR

#11-13, Amish Star, is located at 2505 Weekly Road, Pine Bluff AR. It’s to the right of the driveway when entering the family store. This 4 ft x 4 ft Amish Star is painted in dark and light yellow, dark and light blue, red, and tan.  The barn quilt is used to accentuate the entrance of the family farm store and just below the barn quilt is a sign bearing the store name, “Sweet T Market”.  Ashley first began dreaming of a family store in 2012 when her family moved to Arkansas from Illinois. Travis Thompson took charge of the family chicken farm allowing Ashley the time to homeschool the children, tend to the garden, and raise goats for fresh milk. Then in the summer of 2020 the Thompson family bought a small barn, completed the inside and filled it with homemade goods. They invite all passersby to stop and visit. The market sells goat milk soap and lotions made with goat milk produced on the farm. The farm website is www.sweetTsoap.com and is open by appointment.  Ashley can be contacted by calling or messaging 630-965-3326 or through her facebook page “Sweet T Farm”. Amish quilts came into existence around the 1870s when Amish women made the fabric from hemp, flax or wool which they spun into yarn and then wove into cloth.

#11-14, 8-Point Star
2505 Weekly Rd.
Pine Bluff AR

#11-14 – “8 Point Star” is located at 2505 Weekly Road, Pine Bluff, AR. It’s to the right of the driveway when leaving the family store. This 4 ft x 4 ft barn quilt was designed and painted by Ashley’s daughter in orange, yellow, and blue.  It helps to mark the entrance to the family store when leaving the farm. 
In the 1800’s, quilt-making was more than a hobby, it was a tradition for women and girls to carry on for generations. Just like back then this barn quilt represents family tradition among the Thompson family. Ashley’s grandmother, Charlene Bond born 1932, has been a quilter for over 25 years. She has taught 3 generations how to quilt and doesn’t plan to stop anytime soon. Ashely’s daughter quilted her first quilt at the age of 12 and enjoys creating new quilt designs. The “8 Point Star” barn quilt helps mark the entrance to the family store where handmade quilts are available for purchase.

#11-15, Welcome to Sweet T Farm
2505 Weekly Rd.
Pine Bluff AR

#11-15, Welcome to Sweet T Farm, is an 8 ft x 8 ft barn quilt with the family letter in the center.  It is located at 2505 Weekly Road to the left of the driveway as one travels toward the farm and serves to welcome all guests to Sweet T Farm. Sweet T Farm is a Tyson chicken farm but they also raise cows, pigs, rabbits, and goats. This barn quilt was designed and painted by Ashley Thompson.  She used basic primary colors to draw attention but not overpower the T.  The corners have half square triangles that give a traditional quilt feel. The barn quilt was inspired by a trip the Thompson family took to Mountain View. As the family traveled along the windy roads of the mountains they spotted an old barn with a huge beautiful barn quilt displayed on the front door. Ashley remembers the welcoming feeling it brought as they drove through the mountains. Hoping to instill the same feeling to all who visit Sweet T Farm, Ashley designed and painted the “Welcome to Sweet T Farm” barn quilt.

#11-16, Miss Patches
8115 Marilyn Dr.
Pine Bluff AR

#11-16, Miss Patches, is at 8115 Marilyn Drive, Pine Bluff. It was painted by Jackie Beck. Owner Brenda Simmons shares, “Miss Patches is what I call the bird on my quilt block. When I see her from my kitchen window, she makes my day a little brighter. Throughout my married life, I moved many times. I always wanted to have flowers and a place to feed and watch the birds. I now have those things, and as I believed there would be, there is a lot of pleasure in them. When I see a bird on the feeders, or birdbath, that I do not recognize, I grab my handy binoculars and Birds of North America book. If I cannot identify the bird, the next step is to call my sister-in-law. Together we search to identify the new visitor. We enjoy discussing, describing, and searching together to get the identification correct. Miss Patches/ bright colors light up my backyard. I hope she will be with me for a long time. I thank my niece, Jackie Beck, for painting her for me.”

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