Enter Trail #4, the Perry County Quilt Trail——–sponsored by Perry County Area Chamber of Commerce

#4-01, Ohio Star, is one of a grand collection of barn quilts now totaling nine at the Double D Lazy T Ranch at 3109 Highway 60 West in Perryville. Quilt block owner Debbie Park said “This was my first barn quilt. It is an 8×8’ “Ohio Star”, and it has faded a bit. I’ve repainted it and put our ranch logo (DDT..Double D Lazy T) in the middle block. I used two 4×8’ sheets of 3/4” plywood for this quilt, and it presented quite a challenge for my husband to hang…he had to hire a helper and utilize our tractor to hang it on the new hay barn!” Fortunately, this didn’t hamper the growth of the Park’s barn quilt collection. Nestled in the Fourche La Fave River Valley with a backdrop of the Ouachita Mountains is the Double D Lazy T Ranch and Bed, Breakfast & Barn.  Located three miles west of the quaint town of Perryville, Arkansas on Highway 60 West, this working cattle ranch is home to a unique bed, breakfast and barn.

#4-02, 4-03, 4-04 Dresden Plate
3109 Hwy 60 West
Perryville AR

#4-02, #4-03, #4-04 Dresden Plate, 3109 Hwy 60 West, Perryville AR. Quilt block owner Debbie Park reflected, “As I began this “Sunflower/Dresden Plate” barn quilt adventure, I was drawn to an old pattern already in my family quilt collection, the Dresden Plate. However, as soon as these 4×4’ designs were hung, all I could see were three bright sunflowers bringing sunshine and beauty to this “sow’s ear-turned silk purse” barn. It was formerly my Dad’s hay barn, built by him, from cutting the poles to milling the lumber used. I couldn’t stand the idea of tearing it down when we built our house in 2012, so we made a ‘silk purse from a sow’s ear’, a phrase I’ve heard my Dad use my whole life! The former unsightly hay barn was transformed into an equipment shed with a new metal roof and siding!” Debbie really caught the spirit of barn quilts and you’ll want to allow time to see all of them at the Double D Lazy T Ranch. In fact, you can book your overnight stay at their Bed, Breakfast & Barn overnight to soak up the experience.

#4-05 Besty Ross
3109 Highway 60 West
Perryville AR

#4-05, Betsy Ross is at 3109 Highway 60 West, Perryville. Quilt block owner Debbie Park shares, “This is one of my favorites, for two reasons: I love the ‘Betsy Ross Flag’ pattern, and it is hanging on the oldest remaining ‘barn’ on my childhood home place, where we now live. Daddy always called it the ‘tack barn/tool shed’…the old tack barn is what the barn quilt is attached to. The other side of the structure is a ‘lean-to’ tool shed. I think Dad would love this little barn’s new face lift!” This block is viewed from the highway rather than on the ranch as it faces Highway 60 West. The pattern of the Betsy Ross flag is 13 alternating red-and-white stripes with stars in a field of blue in the upper left corner canton. Its distinguishing feature is thirteen 5-pointed stars arranged in a circle representing the 13 colonies that fought for their independence during the American Revolutionary War.

#4-06 Patriotic Pinwheel
3109 Hwy 60 W
Perryville AR

#4-06, This barn quilt is what owner Debbie Park calls a Patriotic Pinwheel pattern. It is painted directly onto an old farm building, a silo, which has been on the farm I grew up on for as long as I can remember. I tried, unsuccessfully, to give away the former eyesore when we built our house. When there were no takers, I decided to make it into a thing of beauty and put it to work at the same time! The former ugly, empty silo now has a new face greeting passersby on Highway 60 West just outside of Perryville, and it also serves as storage for farm life! The size of the design is approximately 7’Hx5’W. In choosing the design, I Googled barn quilts and looked until I found one that met my criteria: a patriotic design that would look good on the barn red color of the newly painted silo. Since the background was barn red, I only had to actually use two colors, blue and white, to achieve the design. After rough sketching the design onto paper, I determined the size I wanted the actual design to be and started chalking an outline. Then the painting began…it was probably the most difficult of the seven quilts I’ve painted because of the curved surface, but it’s also my favorite. I love having a structure that had been used for years by my Dad brought back to life and usable again!

#4-07 Flags and a Star
3109 Hwy 60 West
Perryville AR

#4-07, Flags and a Star, is a 4’x4’ barn quilt that greets guests to our Bed & Breakfast located in the barn it’s attached to says Debbie Park. We are a patriotic family, and I’m drawn to all things flag related, so this design naturally caught my eye! Learn more about the Double D Lazy T Ranch Bed, Breakfast, and Barn at www.doubledlazytranch.com/Nestled in the Fourche La Fave River Valley with a backdrop of the Ouachita Mountains is the Double D Lazy T Ranch and Bed, Breakfast & Barn.  Located three miles west of the quaint town of Perryville, Arkansas on Highway 60 West, this working cattle ranch is home to a unique bed, breakfast and barn. The BB & B is a former horse barn, converted to living quarters, and consists of a great room/kitchen with fireplace, 3 bedrooms (1 queen and 2 full), and bath.  Relax in comfort with spectacular views of the mountains from the back porch complete with patio furniture, and charcoal grill. A fire pit is available for use. A working ranch, the Double D Lazy T raises cattle along with timber and wildlife. There are numerous opportunities to view the native whitetail deer and waterfowl that call the Double D Lazy T home. For reservations call: 501-250-5833 or 501-270-0664

#4-08 Lone Star
22 Raspberry Lane
Perryville AR

#4-08, Lone Star Quilt Block, four feet by four feet, is located at 22 Raspberry Lane, right outside of Perryville. The home is owned by Joe & Sandra Carter. Joe cut the wood for the block, and the block was painted by their daughter, Kelly Tolley. The block was a birthday gift for Sandra in 2018. “My mom and I have always admired barn quilts, so I decided to make one for her birthday. I knew she would like the simple, classic design of the Lone Star Quilt Block.” The quilt block is an endearing and enduring gift that will be appreciated by Sandra and her family for years to come. Quilts have been treasured gifts to celebrate weddings, graduations, new babies, friendships, and more. Painted barn quilts are a relatively new way to share the love of quilts and quilt patterns and they have the added bonus of visibility for others to appreciate as they drive the highways. Enjoy your drive looking at the barn quilts in Perry County! You’ll see the creativity and artistry of the creators come alive.

#4-09 Crossed Canoes
106 N. Fourche Ave.
Perryville AR

#4-09, Crossed Canoes, at 106 N. Fourche Ave, Perryville. This pattern was selected because of the lakes in Perry County including Harris Brake, one of the largest lakes ever built by a state wildlife agency, with Fishing, Hunting, Camping, Canoeing. Two miles South of Perryville well known for bluegill, channel catfish, crappie, hybrid striped bass, largemouthbass and red ear sunfish. Nimrod Lake with 400 miles of shoreline on the oldest Corps of Engineers lake in the state: Boating, Water Skiing, Fishing. Lake Sylvia with its 18 acres of Camping, picnicking, swimming, diving, fishing, volleyball, horseshoes, hiking, biking and Interpretive Trails. The artists at The Hidden Gallery wanted to add this quilt block in honor of the many people that use the lakes for entertainment. The block was painted by Peggy Blazer for the Hidden Gallery.

#4-10, Entwined Squares at 106 N. Fourche Ave, Perryville AR

#4-10, Entwined Squares is at 106 N. Fourche Ave., Perryville AR. Almost all Quilt Blocks begin with the simple square. This Entwined Squares block done at the Hidden Gallery, according to Alma Gipson is added to her collection to honor all the quilters in Perry County, past and present, who continue the tradition of quilting. The teal and black colors create a simple but striking pattern. These dedicated quilters have added beauty and warmth to many Perry County homes over the years. The wide availability of fabrics in modern times has resulted in many brightly colored quilts that add to the collection of quilts in the area.


#4-11, Eight Point Star
106 N. Fourche Avenue, Perryville AR

#4-11, Eight Point Star, 106 N. Fourche Ave., Perryville was painted at the Hidden Gallery. Owner Alma Gipson notes that stars are simple and complex at the same time. Life in a rural setting is often simple and complex at the same time. In rural Perry County the stars are very visible in the night sky. It seems only fitting to add this pattern to Perry County’s selections.



#4-13 Star of Bethlehem
#4-13, Star of Bethlehem
5 Marvin Drive, Houston, AR
Hwy 216 between Houston and Perryville

#4-13, Star Of Bethlehem, located at 5 Marvin Drive, Houston, Arkansas on Hwy 216 between Houston and Perryville in west central Arkansas. Painted by Angel Leadingham, the 4×4 foot quilt block is on a “she shed” owned by Angel and Woody Leadingham. The location is on an old Christmas tree farm that no longer exists near the Antioch Baptist Church in the Antioch community in the Ouachita mountains. Just six blocks to the north lies Harris Brake Lake and to the west is Heifer Project International. To the east is the Fourche La Fave river and south is the Ouachita National Forest. The Star of Bethlehem is backed by a simple nine patch pattern of blue-green and white which symbolizes our National Forest and the old Christmas tree farm. The center being the Star of Bethlehem representing our following Jesus Christ. The Simple nine patch pattern was designed by women traveling west in covered wagons in the early 1800’s because these blocks could be put together with old clothes, feed, sugar and flour sacks. They could be stored in a small place and later made into a full size quilt when they reached their destination. The Star’s origin could be found in the night sky over Bethlehem guiding shepherds and wise men to the Christ child some 2000 years ago.


#4-14, Sunbonnet Sue
3055 Highway 60 West
Perryville AR

#4-14, Sunbonnet Sue, is at 3055 Highway 60 West, Perryville on the east side of the mailbox. Owner Pat Hatfield shares, “I belong to the Busy Bees Quilters in Perryville and we create, sew and hand-stitch quilts weekly. What better way to show my love for quilting than to join the Quilt Trail? My entry is known as Sunbonnet Sue, and is an 18″ square. This particular pattern is special to me because it is a replica of a quilt block made by my mother, Mildred Cox Williams, when she was a young wife and mother in the 1940’s. Her framed Sunbonnet Sue quilt block hangs in my house.”


#4-15, Dreamer’s Weave
3055 Highway 60 West
Perryville AR

#4-15, Dreamer’s Weave is at 3055 Highway 60 West, Perryville on the west side of the mailbox. Quilt block owner, Pat Hatfield said, “My second painted quilt block is called Dreamer’s Weave. I love the simplicity of the pattern, but it’s also special because this is the first quilt pattern I made for myself. It is painted as a 18′ square. Be sure to see both blocks on the mailbox at this location.


#4-16, Welcome Home
89 Calfneck Road
Perryville AR

#4-16, Welcome Home block is at 89 Calfneck Road, Perryville, Owner of the barn and block Eleanor Jester shares, “We bought the house and barn in July 1987. I have always loved the barn and was so pleased to receive the 8 x 8 foot quilt square from my daughter and son-in-law as a Christmas gift. We do not know when the barn was built. According to our research, we believe it is a Gothic or rainbow arch barn. The rafters are curved so that no framing obstructs the loft. The barn is a two story with a full second floor designed to store hay. The second floor can be accessed directly from the back of the barn or from the stairs inside the barn.” It’s easy to see that the sight of the barn and quilt block is a like a “welcome home” greeting every time the owners return home.


#4-17, Homestead Star
17 Sunshine Farms Rd.
Bigelow, AR

#4-17, Homestead Star was placed at the peak of our garage, the highest point on our property. Located at 17 Sunshine Farms Road, home of Jerry and Janice Tucker. It was made with pressure treated wood, 4’x4’ square. The star block is one of our favorites and you will find it replicated on three separate blocks on the garage. This is one of three blocks at this location near Bigelow. The visitor will want to also see a strikingly beautiful historic structure, Saint Boniface Catholic Church, which near the location of these blocks. The nucleus of Saint Boniface Catholic Church was formed in 1879 by a few determined German families.  The first parishioners were of German Swiss and Irish descent.  Family names included: Hampel, Lipsmeyer, Miller, Nagel, Nutt, Olles Rump, Siefker and Volpert.  They attended Mass in private homes until a church could be built.  A Benedictine monk from Subiaco Abbey traveled down the Arkansas River by boat to first serve the small community.  Story continued below.


#4-18, Wyoming Valley Star
17 Sunshine Farms Rd.
Bigelow AR
  • #4-18, Wyoming Valley Star is on the lower left front of the Tucker garage. Located at 17 Sunshine Farms Rd, the home of Jerry and Janice Tucker. We saw this star block on a fence while on vacation out west a few years ago and filed it away as a “One of these days, project.” It’s a 4’x4’ square. You can see three quilt blocks at this location near Bigelow. Be sure and see all the Tucker creations. Continuing the history of nearby Saint Boniface… The Choctaw Railroad (today the Rock Island Railroad) donated 40 acres of land to the community.  A church, school and rectory were built.  A house, connected to the church by covered walkway, was constructed for the nuns who taught in the school.  In early 1906, the house caught fire while Mass was being celebrated in the adjoining church.  Although both buildings were destroyed, the high altar, which had been imported from Germany by a parishioner, was saved.  The people began work on a new church, hiring fellow parishioner Oswald Miller to design and build the church.  The lumber was cut from church property and milled by Fourche River Lumber Company in Bigelow.  The church was constructed by fall of the same year.  A 5-Foot cross was placed on top of the 95-foot steeple.  Miller carved spiral work for two new side altars to match the original high altar.  The Catholic Union of Arkansas had planned to hold their annual meeting at New Dixie that year; by September, 1906, the church was completed and Mass was offered for the first time at the opening of the meeting.

#4-19, The Swoon
17 Sunshine Farms Rd.
Bigelow, AR




#4-19, The Swoon block is located on the lower right front of the Tucker garage. It is located at 17 Sunshine Farms Rd, the home of Jerry and Janice Tucker. This star block is a relatively new block that has became popular in the last few years. It is a 4’x4’ block. This is one of three blocks at this location. Finishing the Saint Boniface story…In 1948, a two room school with a hall and stage was dedicated which replaced the one-room school previously used.  The school was used by all grades until 1958 when the upper grades consolidated with the Bigelow school system.  The school closed in 1969 and the nuns left to teach in other schools.  The remaining 32 students went to schools in Bigelow, Conway and Morrilton.  Lightning struck the school/hall in 1976; the resulting fire destroyed the building.  Construction began on the current hall that same year and was completed in 1977.  In 2008, an office building was constructed on property purchased near the church.       Changes have been made to the church over the years, including steel siding, central heat and air, and sanctuary carpeting.  Parishioners replaced the wooden roof with slate shingles around 1948.  For many years, the church had blue stained glass windows in the nave which had replaced the original windows.  In 2002, the blue glass was replaced with multi-colored stained glass to restore the original window design.  The three west windows, the vestibule window, and sanctuary windows and most of the sacristy windows are originals from the 1906 construction.  In the interest of restoring the church to its original appearance, hardwood floors were installed in 2010.  At the time, new wooden pews were installed to replace the “modern” style pews which had been placed in the church around 1990. For over 100 years the church has been the gathering place for parishioners of St. Boniface.  The bells, placed in the steeple in 1906, are still tolled by hand today and ring out across the community every Sunday.


#4-20, Star Spangled
3109 Hwy 60 West
Perryville AR

#4-20, Star Spangled barn quilt is hanging on the barn that is the Double D Lazy T Bed, Breakfast, & Barn at 3109 Hwy. 60 West in Perryville, AR. This design was chosen because the patriotic pattern complimented another quilt already hanging on the B & B. This quilt is 4’ x 8’, and hints of cozy quilts you might snuggle into while staying at the B & B! This is Barn Quilt #8 for owner and resident barn quilt painter, Debbie Park. Worth a drive just to see all the blocks at this location! And you can stay overnight at the Double D Lazy T Bed, Breakfast, & Barn. Thank you, Debbie, for being such a spark for the Perry County Quilt Trail!


#4-21, Rock Island
722 Bryant St.
Bigelow AR

#4-21, Rock Island barn quilt pattern at 722 Bryant St., Bigelow, AR is a train engine.  Located in the Fourche community, it was painted in memory of L.W. Egger and in honor of brothers Larry and Rick who all worked for the railroad.  It is also in memory of all the uncles, cousins, and men from Bigelow, Arkansas who worked for the railroad. Here’s to all those, past and present, who’ve made the rail industry what it is today in Arkansas and to points beyond. We still rely on the railroad for our modern day economy. From the Encyclopedia of Arkansas, “The construction of railroads had a significant impact on the state, creating towns where none had existed while all but eliminating others due to their lack of ready rail access. Many of the cities and towns in the state were named after prominent railroad executives who influenced, and in some cases were essential to, these communities’ development. While very little passenger service still exists, many of the same routes are used to transport a wide variety of goods throughout the state and beyond. ”


#4-22 Hibbard Mariner’s Compass
25 Forest Cove
Perryville AR

#4-22, Hibbard Mariner’s Compass is at 25 Forest Cove, Perryville. Patricia Hibbard shares about her block. “Compasses are used not only by mariners but also by aviators. The Mariner’s Compass was chosen as a fond reminder of many years my husband spent as a USAF Navigator in the C-130 airplane. This is our retirement home on Harris Brake Lake and as we sit on our deck we frequently can see these planes flying over. It was a comforting thought that no matter where in the world my husband flew, he could always use a compass to find his way home night or day, rain or shine. The block was completed with help from our granddaughter.” What a terrific multi-generational project that brings families together in a creative way! Perhaps we should all plan a barn quilt painting at our next family gathering. It would leave us with a visible way to remember the fun times together. After all, quilts have always been about family, those who created the quilts and those who enjoyed their warmth and comfort.


#4-23, Mixed Colors
73 Shady Lane
Perryville AR

#4-23, Mixed Colors, is at 73 Shady Lane, Perryville, AR. Quilt block owner Shirley Boyette shares, “Quilting and painting have long been a part of my life.  I have enjoyed them both for 25 plus years.  For the past several years, I have quilted with the Busy Bee Quilters at the Diane Wilson Senior Center and money received for our quilting projects is donated back to the center.  I chose this pattern because of its simplicity and bold colors.  My love for quilting and also for my community guided me choose to create a block for the Perry County Quilt Trail.”


#4-24 Home Sweet Home
3109 Highway 60 West
Perryville AR

#4-24, Home Sweet Home, 3109 Highway 60 West, Perryville is what owner Debbie Park named this 18” square barn quilt, located on the west side of the mailbox. It is a simple house design, and it gives a nod to the first barn quilt I painted, The Ohio Star, which is located on the hay barn on the left as you drive down our driveway. Both Ohio Star barn quilts are adorned with our ranch logo, DDT (Double D Lazy T). It is painted on an 18” square of 3/4” plywood.


#4-25, Quilted Barn
3109 Hwy 60 West
Perryville AR

#4-25, The Quilted Barn is what Debbie Park named this barn quilt (the 10th on our property!). Located on the mailbox at 3109 Highway 60 West, Perryville, it serves as a “welcome” to our guests as they arrive at our barn bed and breakfast, The Double D Lazy T Bed, Breakfast & Barn. While searching for the perfect design, I happened upon this barn design and it seemed the perfect fit for our bed and breakfast. It even has a barn quilt painted on the barn! This 18” square block is painted on 3/4” plywood, and is located on the east side of the mailbox at 3109 Hwy 60 West, Perryville. Find more information about Double D Lazy T Bed, Breakfast, & Barn at http://www.doubledlazytranch.com/. Call 501-250-5833 or 501-270-0664.



#4-26, Red/Yellow Pinwheel
106 N. Fourche Ave.
Perryville AR

#4-26, Red & Yellow Pinwheel, 106 N. Fourche Ave., Perryville was painted by Alma Gipson. Perry County was created as the 44th county of Arkansas in 1840. It was formed from part of Conway County, south of the Arkansas River. The original name proposed for the “Fourche La Fave.” While the bill to name the county was in committee, the county name was changed to Perry. This name was chosen to honor Commodore William Hazard Perry, a naval hero of the War of 1812. The original county consisted of territory south of the Arkansas River, Fourche La Fave River, Petit Jean and Part of Cadron Township. Perryville is the county seat. Encyclopedia of America states the earliest recorded settlers near the area were the Prices in 1808. John Price, of that family, settled on land later known as Old Perryville in the 1830s. At the outset, John L. Houston’s home doubled as a temporary justice building and mail delivery station. Thomas Madden ran a water powered mill near the forks, and other businesses were soon to be established. Names of the early settlers included Bland, Buckingham, Cook, Greathouse, Houston, and Rankin. In 1847, John L. Houston had a ferry making runs across the Fourche. In 1844, John Rison moved to Price’s old site and built a log house for his new wife, Harriett. The young couple began a Methodist church, and their house became a center for community affairs. This hewn log house remains standing and is the town’s oldest building. In 1849, Rison expanded his patronage by buying six lots across from his home to build a log store and a schoolhouse.


#4-27, Mariner’s Compass
106 N Fourche Ave.
Perryville AR

#4-27, Mariner’s Compass, 106 N. Fourche Ave., Perryville. Perryville’s proximity to area lakes, rivers, wildlife refuges, and Petit Jean State Park offers unlimited water sports, hunting and other forms of recreation. Lake Sylvia is nestled between scenic pine and oak-clad mountains in the northeast corner of the Ouachita National Forest. The serene 18-acre lake is noted for its swimming and fishing opportunities only 38 miles west of Little Rock. Take Arkansas Hwy. 9 south from Perryville, AR for 9 miles; turn right (southwest) at sign on Arkansas Hwy. 324 for 4 miles. The trail system around Lake Sylvia offers the visitor an opportunity to enjoy an easy nature walk with interpretive signs or venture to the Ouachita National Recreation Trail for a backpackers experience. The Trees of the Forest interpretive trail is an accessible trail for the physically disabled visitors. Each interpretive sign features information on the variety of tree species found in the area. Each sign also offers the text in Braille format. Another interpretive trail, the Wildlife Trail, offers information identifying the common wildlife species in the area. The trail loops through part of the Chinquapin Mountain Walk-in Turkey Area, which also connects with the Ouachita National Recreation Trail. The Lake Sylvia Spur Trail is an additional access provided for the hikers to connect with the Ouachita National Recreation Trail from the Lake Sylvia Recreation Area.


#4-28, Irish Knot
106 N. Fourche Ave.
Perryville AR

#4-28, Irish Knot, 106 N. Fourche Ave., Perryville was painted by Alma Gipson who shared, “Due to my Irish heritage, I had to paint this block. Very interesting and artful. I love this block. Everyone has a little Irish in his or her heart.” Irish migration to Arkansas took place throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in three distinct settlements. Over the years, Irish residents of Arkansas have made their mark on the state, exemplified in organizations such as the Irish Cultural Society of Arkansas. About fifteen percent of Arkansans claim Irish or Scotch-Irish ancestry. The Irish Cultural Society of Arkansas (ICSA) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, public-service organization based in Little Rock. It was founded in 1996 to develop and enhance local interest in the culture of Ireland and its people, familiarize the general public with the culture of the Irish people and the richness of their contribution to America, reacquaint Arkansans of Irish descent with their culture and ethnic history, and publicize the presence of an active Irish community in the Little Rock area. During the 1980s, as the result of a surplus of women in the nursing profession in Ireland, many Irish women immigrated to the United States and settled in Arkansas, which faced a shortage of qualified nurses at the time. Recruited by area hospitals, the nurses from Ireland and Great Britain originally intended to work in Arkansas for just a few years and then return to their homeland. Instead, many of them married and settled in the Little Rock area and began to raise families. As their children grew, they realized the importance of passing on their Irish culture and heritage to their American-born children. This led a group of Irish nationals to found the Irish Cultural Society of Arkansas.


#4-29, Peace, Love, & Lipstick
106 N. Fourche Ave.
Perryville AR

#4-29, Peace, Love and Lipstick at 106 N. Fourche Ave., Perryville. This quilt block represents how the community of Perry County, and in particular one amazing woman, opened their arms to a “transplanted” city girl!  It was painted on a 4×4 piece and was designed by Angela Pritchard and painted by Karen Williams. It is an unconventional design that paints the picture of open arms, unconditional love and an unbreakable bond between ladies who love lipstick.


#4-30, Patriotic Star
106 N. Fourche Ave.
Perryville AR

#4-30, Patriotic Star, 106 N. Fourche Ave., Perryville was painted by Alma Gipson. One way the county recognizes its veterans is shared by Carol Rolfe in an Arkansas Democrat Gazette story: The Perry County Historical Museum continues working toward its goal of being “a place where the past lives on.” Mike Allison, a native of Perry County and president of the museum’s board of directors, said the museum “is dedicated to preserving the past to create a living memory for future generations.” “We just want to keep this building open,” he said, adding that the museum is housed in what is known locally as the American Legion Hut, built in 1935 with the help of the Civilian Conservation Corps. In 2005, the Arkansas Chapter of the American Legion deeded the American Legion building to the Perry County Historical Museum, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. The museum remains the central location for the chapter’s documents and collectibles, tracing military service back to World War I. The museum, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, has an extended collection of military memorabilia but is seeking more. “We are still in need of copies of photographs and military information of the Perry County men and women who served their country,” said Kathy Rankin, a longtime volunteer at the museum and secretary of its board of directors. “We are putting this information in scrapbooks.” The museum is open from 10 to 2 every fourth Saturday of the month (check for current hours). Rankin said members of the community are invited to bring their photos and other information, which can be scanned by a volunteer during that time.


#4-31, John Deere
106 N. Fourche Ave.
Perryville AR

#4-31, John Deere at 106 N. Fourche Ave., Perryville was painted by Peggy Blazer who chose the pattern because her father-in-law’s family were farmers. They always had John Deere tractors on their farm. Perry County has a rich tradition of farming. In 2020, the honor of being the Perry County Farm Family of the Year came full circle for Dena Johnson and her family. Dena Johnson, 57, and her husband, Quinten Johnson, 61, were named the 2020 Perry County Farm Family of the Year. The Johnsons have three adult children — James Johnson, 26, Samantha Nahlen, 24, and Matthew Johnson, 20. They raise turkeys and cattle on their 750 acres that spill over into three counties — Perry, Conway and Yell. Dena’s parents, Barbara Jo Brixey of the Rose Creek community and the late Jim Brixey, received the Perry County Farm Family of the Year honor in 1977. Dena’s brother, Kenny Brixey, and his wife, Kim Brixey, also of the Rose Creek community, received the honor in 2000. “It’s come full circle for our family,” Dena said, smiling, as she sat in the living room of their home in the Perry County community called Bryant’s Cove, named for the Bryant’s Cove Cemetery that’s just down the road in Conway County. “Mom and Dad just had me and Kenny, and now we’ve all been recognized for farming. “Farming is important,” she said. “We’ve all got to eat. Cattle farmers, turkey farmers, row-croppers … all of us put food on the table. We’re proud to be farmers. It takes us all.” The Johnsons’ seven houses of turkeys are under contract with Butterball LLC and are processed at the company’s plant in Ozark. The Johnsons sell their cattle at local sale barns. They sell turkey litter to surrounding farmers for fertilizer. They also have a 40-acre timber plantation. (Excerpt from Carol Rolf story published in the Arkansas Democrat Gazette, 8-2-20)

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